Phèdre

In 1995, after the final rehearsals of Dans la solitude des champs de coton, Moidele Bickel, the costume designer, said to Patrice Chéreau: "Now you have to do Racine, and the same way", adding that he had to explore the language
"like that". The invitation was somewhat enigmatic, but not likely to be forgotten. Chéreau read Racine again and saw it take shape. The encounter with the work of Koltès may have been the preparation needed to decode, beneath the clear links and chains of syntax, the obsession of another side of language, fleeing, hidden, ineffable, yet bound to forge a path, relentlessly, towards the light. Phèdre is the grand tragedy of admission or denial, for beneath every step lies a truth that cannot be admitted. The entire plot is a lingering descent to death, a brief solar parenthesis, an implacable interlude standing between the two protagonists and their end. Phèdre and Hippolyte appear as two sides of one same fate (indeed, in 1677, Racine combined the two names in the title of the original edition, a version featuring flowing, meandering punctuation preferred by Chéreau). One side is pure, the other is cursed; but they will not be separated and in their duel appear to befoul one another, forming strange collusions. Both succumb to temptation, as a word inadvertently reveals a desire or a flaw, and can never be retrieved. Both remain silent on their confrontation and become accomplices to the same fatal secret. At the start of the play, both are fleeing. From the opening line of verse, Hippolyte proclaims his decision to set off in search of Thésée. With dreams of wandering and adventure, he sees himself, like his father, the "demi-god" who rid the universe of "monsters repressed". But as soon as Phèdre comes on stage, she declares that she must remain. She can only disappear by dying, following a husband once "dishonouring the couch of Hades' god." Hippolyte would flee the earth; Phèdre would be swallowed up in Hell. Thésée is the mercurial and eminently absent hero figure, is the paradoxical master of order and delight, whose will prevails to the point where his words become flesh; his son would imitate his exploits, and for his wife there is the power of transgression. To explore the secrets of this tortured family, Patrice Chéreau has chosen Pascal Greggory (Thésée), Eric Ruf (Hippolyte) and Michelle Marquais (Oenone), Michel Duchaussoy (Théramène) and Marina Hands, Agnès Sourdillon and Nathalie Bécue. And it is Dominique Blanc (who so impressed Odéon audiences in "A Doll's House" in 1997), who was Chéreau's choice, after many years working together, for one of the major and most demanding roles in the repertoire.


Berthier grande salle

France

Berthier grande salle

January 15 2003 to April 20 2003

Phèdre

Racine Jean

Chéreau Patrice

New Production

Votre venue

Berthier grande salle
Access

Prices

More info
  • Phèdre | © D.R.
    © D.R.
  • Phèdre | © D.R.
    © D.R.
  • Phèdre | © Pascal Victor
    © Pascal Victor
  • Phèdre | © Pascal Victor
    © Pascal Victor
  • Phèdre | © Pascal Victor
    © Pascal Victor
  • Phèdre | © Pascal Victor
    © Pascal Victor
  • Phèdre | © Pascal Victor
    © Pascal Victor
  • Phèdre | © Pascal Victor
    © Pascal Victor
  • Phèdre | © Pascal Victor
    © Pascal Victor
  • Phèdre | © Pascal Victor
    © Pascal Victor
  • Phèdre | © Pascal Victor
    © Pascal Victor
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas
  • Phèdre | © Ros Ribas
    © Ros Ribas

In 1995, after the final rehearsals of Dans la solitude des champs de coton, Moidele Bickel, the costume designer, said to Patrice Chéreau: "Now you have to do Racine, and the same way", adding that he had to explore the language
"like that". The invitation was somewhat enigmatic, but not likely to be forgotten. Chéreau read Racine again and saw it take shape. The encounter with the work of Koltès may have been the preparation needed to decode, beneath the clear links and chains of syntax, the obsession of another side of language, fleeing, hidden, ineffable, yet bound to forge a path, relentlessly, towards the light. Phèdre is the grand tragedy of admission or denial, for beneath every step lies a truth that cannot be admitted. The entire plot is a lingering descent to death, a brief solar parenthesis, an implacable interlude standing between the two protagonists and their end. Phèdre and Hippolyte appear as two sides of one same fate (indeed, in 1677, Racine combined the two names in the title of the original edition, a version featuring flowing, meandering punctuation preferred by Chéreau). One side is pure, the other is cursed; but they will not be separated and in their duel appear to befoul one another, forming strange collusions. Both succumb to temptation, as a word inadvertently reveals a desire or a flaw, and can never be retrieved. Both remain silent on their confrontation and become accomplices to the same fatal secret. At the start of the play, both are fleeing. From the opening line of verse, Hippolyte proclaims his decision to set off in search of Thésée. With dreams of wandering and adventure, he sees himself, like his father, the "demi-god" who rid the universe of "monsters repressed". But as soon as Phèdre comes on stage, she declares that she must remain. She can only disappear by dying, following a husband once "dishonouring the couch of Hades' god." Hippolyte would flee the earth; Phèdre would be swallowed up in Hell. Thésée is the mercurial and eminently absent hero figure, is the paradoxical master of order and delight, whose will prevails to the point where his words become flesh; his son would imitate his exploits, and for his wife there is the power of transgression. To explore the secrets of this tortured family, Patrice Chéreau has chosen Pascal Greggory (Thésée), Eric Ruf (Hippolyte) and Michelle Marquais (Oenone), Michel Duchaussoy (Théramène) and Marina Hands, Agnès Sourdillon and Nathalie Bécue. And it is Dominique Blanc (who so impressed Odéon audiences in "A Doll's House" in 1997), who was Chéreau's choice, after many years working together, for one of the major and most demanding roles in the repertoire.

Autour du spectacle

Credits

by JEAN RACINE
directed by PATRICE CHEREAU

sets: Richard Peduzzi
costumes: Moidele Bickel
lighting: Dominique Bruguière
make-up and hair-styles: Kuno Schlegelmilch
with Nathalie Bécue, Dominique Blanc, Michel Duchaussoy, Pascal Greggory, Marina Hands, Christiane Cohendy, Eric Ruf, Agnès Sourdillon

production : Odéon-Théâtre de l'Europe, RuhrTriennale

Director

Patrice Chéreau Patrice

Patrice Chéreau dirige à 22 ans le Théâtre de Sartrouville puis part travailler à Milan, au Piccolo Teatro. Codirecteur du TNP de Villeurbanne (1972-1981), il y aborde Marlowe, Marivaux, Bond, Wenzel, Ibsen...
Directeur du Théâtre des Amandiers de Nanterre avec Catherine Tasca (1982-1990), il contribue à révéler l'œuvre de Koltès et monte aussi Genet, Heiner Müller, Tchekhov, Shakespeare (Hamlet, Festival d’Avignon 1988).
À l'opéra, il travaille notamment avec Pierre Boulez (le Ring de Wagner, Festival de Bayreuth, 1976-1980 ; Lulu de Berg, Opéra de Paris, 1979 ; De la Maison des morts de Janacek, en collaboration avec Thierry Thieû Niang, Festival d'Aix-en-Provence, 2007-2009), Daniel Barenboim (Wozzeck de Berg et Don Giovanni de Mozart, 1994-1996 ; Tristan und Isolde de Wagner, Scala de Milan, 2007), ou Esa-Pekka Salonen (Elektra, de Strauss, Festival d'Aixen-Provence, juillet 2013).
Au cinéma, L’Homme blessé remporte en 1984 le César du meilleur scénario. Viennent ensuite, entre autres, La Reine Margot, prix du jury au Festival de Cannes 1994 ; Ceux qui m'aiment prendront le train, César 1999 du Meilleur réalisateur ; Intimité, Ours d'or au Festival de Berlin et Prix Louis Delluc 2001 ; Son frère, Ours d’argent 2003 du meilleur réalisateur. Dernières réalisations : Gabrielle, avec Isabelle Huppert et Pascal Greggory (2005) ; Persécution, avec Romain Duris, Charlotte Gainsbourg et Jean-Hugues Anglade (2009).
Sa Phèdre, de Racine, avec Dominique Blanc, marque en 2003 l'inauguration des Ateliers Berthier. En collaboration avec Thierry Thieû Niang, il a monté depuis La Douleur de Marguerite Duras (2009), puis La Nuit juste avant les forêts de Bernard-Marie Koltès (2011). En novembre 2010, il a été le grand invité du Louvre dans le cadre d’un programme intitulé Les visages et les corps, dont la pièce maîtresse aura été la mise en scène de Rêve d’Automne, de Jon Fosse, au cœur du Musée, puis au Théâtre de la Ville.  En 2011 il monte I am the wInd (Je suis le vent) de Jon Fosse.
Il devait créer Comme il vous plaira de Shakespeare en mars 2014 aux Ateliers Berthier.

A l'Odéon,
- il a présenté en janvier 1970 son Richard II de Shakespeare, créé à Marseille.
- il a créé Le temps et la chambre de Botho Strauss (1991)
- puis une nouvelle version de Dans la solitude des champs de coton, de Koltès, en 1995. Ce spectacle a tourné dans de nombreux pays.
- En 2003 il a mis en scène la Phèdre de Racine, inaugurant magistralement les Ateliers Berthier de l'Odéon.

Il a également lu sur la scène de l'Odéon deux textes de Dostoïevski :
- Les Carnets du sous-sol, en mars 2002
- Le Grand inquisiteur, un extrait des Frères Karamazov, en déc. 2006
et Coma, de Pierre Guyotat, en avril 2009

Author

Jean Racine Jean

(1639-1699)

Orphelin à trois ans, Jean Racine est éduqué à Port-Royal. Il devient l'ami de fils de grandes familles du royaume, relations qui lui seront fort utiles dans sa carrière.
Décidé à devenir auteur, Racine essaye vainement d'obtenir un bénéfice ecclésiastique pour assurer sa vie matérielle. Colbert lui fait pourtant obtenir une pension en 1664, qu'il conservera jusqu'à sa mort.
Racine est d'abord reconnu comme poète officiel.
En juin 1664 Molière accepte de jouer sa première tragédie : La Thébaïde ou Les Frères ennemis.
En 1665, il obtient le succès avec Alexandre le Grand, mais se brouille avec Molière en donnant sa pièce à l'Hôtel de Bourgogne, théâtre rival.
Racine défend le genre théâtral contre la position de l'Eglise et de Port-Royal en particulier, attaquant ainsi ses anciens maîtres.
Sa gloire réelle date du succès considérable d'Andromaque, en novembre 1667.
Avec Bérénice (1670), dédiée à Colbert, Racine obtient l'enthousiasme du public et triomphe devant Corneille (qui avait auparavant écrit Tite et Bérénice).
En 1673, il entre à l'Académie française, et devient Trésorier de France, à Moulins.
Phèdre est créée en 1677, et se trouve alors en rivalité avec une autre pièce, Phèdre et Hippolyte (d'un obscur poète, Pradon) que jouait le théâtre de Molière. Cette pièce, soutenue par le duc de Nevers et toute une cabale, rencontre d'abord le succès avant d'être rapidement supplantée par Phèdre, qui apparaît bien vite comme le grand chef-d'oeuvre de Racine. Pourtant celui-ci, très affecté par l'échec des premières représentations, abandonne le théâtre et retourne dans le sein de l'Eglise.

Très mondain, Racine est souvent détesté de ses confrères, qui lui reprochent aussi son allure de bon bourgeois, ses placements financiers, son désir de respectabilité.
En 1677, Racine accepte la charge (et l'honneur) d'écrire l'histoire officielle du Roi, charge qu'il partage avec Boileau. A 37 ans, Racine a cessé d'écrire pour le théâtre, n'écrivant plus que quelques livrets d'opéras pour le Roi. Mais il est l'auteur dramatique le plus joué et admiré, et ses oeuvres complètes paraissent dès 1687.

En 1689, Mme de Maintenon le convainc d'écrire une pièce édifiante pour ses jeunes protégées de Saint-Cyr. Esther est jouée à la Cour et obtient un immense succès, avant que les dévots ne reviennent à la charge et s'offusquent qu'on joue du théâtre au sein de l'Eglise. Athalie (1690), nouvelle commande de Saint-Cyr, n'y sera jamais jouée.
La même année, la tante de Racine devient abbesse de Port-Royal. Alors que l'abbaye est considérée comme le bastion du Jansénisme, Racine s'en fait le défenseur.
Il meurt le 21 avril 1699, et est enterré selon ses voeux à Port-Royal.

Les pièces de Racine sont jouées au Théâtre de l'Odéon tout au long de son histoire. Les dernières années ont accueilli :
- Andromaque, ms Jean-Louis Barrault en 1962-63, et ms Jean-Paul Roussillon, en 1973-74.
- Bajazet, ms Jean Gillibert, en 1973-74.
- Athalie, ms Roger Planchon, en 1980-81.
- Britannicus, ms Gildas Bourdet, en 1980-81.
- Esther, ms Françoise Seigner, en 1986-87.
- Phèdre, ms Luc Bondy, en 1998, et ms Patrice Chéreau, pour l'inauguration de l'installation de l'Odéon aux ateliers Berthier pendant les travaux du théâtre, en 2003.

Excerpt